Alan Soh aka Humourboi

I am my own columnist, publishing my thoughts!


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Breaking The Sound Barrier (Part 3)

Workplace

As mentiond in my earlier blog post, I was interviewed for a MediaCorp TODAY article.

The survey findings collected by my NTU student mentees are expected of sort. And that is the reason why they want to do this “Breaking The Sound Barrier” project.

There are many misconceptions about the deaf community.

There should be NO discrimination. Seek to understand them and their abilities.

I feel strongly that our employers should be open-minded to look at job suitability in accordance to abilities, and re-align work processes if possible. In fact, our Government is also trying to chip in to help, providing certain schemes to defray costs of creating an inclusive workplace.

Other than highlighting more deaf role models in press/social media, I also think it is important for these special individuals to work hard on expanding their capabilities at the same time. Learnability. Adaptability. Transferable skills. A positive attitude helps.

With confidence, aim to BLOW the minds off these employers out there –

I am MORE than what you think I am.

Here I reproduce the article:

One in two employers do not intend to hire the deaf people: Survey.

SINGAPORE — When he went for job interviews, Mr Alfred Yeo who is deaf, would be asked how he would communicate with colleagues, or if he could read lips.

Many of these companies would not follow up after.

But two years ago, the 38-year-old landed a job as an accounts assistant, and his employer made it a point to email all his workers beforehand to share details on how to communicate with deaf people.

Mr Yeo’s experience is a rare one, going by a survey of 77 companies conducted by a group of final-year students from Nanyang Technological University (NTU).

Only one in 10 employers surveyed have positive attitudes towards hiring deaf people, and one in two admit they have no intention to do so.

Some of the reasons given include concerns that deaf persons would not be able to communicate with clients, bosses and colleagues. Some of them said they had not come across any deaf applicants — perhaps by design.

Born with a dead right ear, Mr Alan Soh would struggle over whether to make it known that he was hard of hearing when he applies for jobs.

Sharing his experience, he said although he has had cochlear implant surgery done on his right ear, he remained apprehensive about writing his contact number on job applications, for fear he would not be able to clearly hear what recruiters say over the phone.

I (was) worried — will it blow my chances of being granted a job interview?” he said.

Even as they see attitudes gradually changing, deaf persons and associations that work with this group did not find the survey results surprising, noting that securing a job remains a significant challenge.

Touch Silent Club senior manager Danny Loke said: “The fear of discrimination is still very real among the deaf community as they often struggle to decide if they should indicate their hearing loss in their resumes.”

Singapore Association for the Deaf (SADeaf) executive director Sylvia Teng said the challenges facing the deaf and hard-of-hearing community can only be overcome with a “certain (level of) understanding from employers, to be willing to make minor adjustments to job requirements to engage the deaf employee in alternative ways”.

To engage with employers, SADeaf launched its job support service in January, and also found that many companies were receptive to hiring and offering equal job opportunities to deaf or hard-of-hearing persons.

Mr Soh felt that without being given opportunities, such individuals would not be able to show what they are capable of.

Many of them could be raw diamonds, having the innate potential to go far in life,” he added.

This survey was conducted by a group of communication studies students from NTU’s Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information. Called “Breaking the Sound Barrier”, the group aims to encourage employers to adopt more positive attitudes towards the hiring of deaf persons.

The group had written to over 200 companies to take part in the survey. Most of the 77 organisations that responded were small and medium enterprises.


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Random National Day Questions

1. What is your favourite National Day Song?
Answer: “Home”.

2. What makes you Uniquely Singaporean?
Answer: I use singlish terms such as lah/leh/lor/hor/wor/sibei/wah lau when I chat informally with people at social events. I sometimes also do use tissue paper packets to reserve hawker centre seats. Under the influence of another Singaporean friend, I now learnt to compare prices of same product (especially IT products) at different stores before making a final purchase decision. Hahahaha….

3. What is your favourite icon of Singapore?
Answer: I don’t have a favourite one. Maybe Singa the Lion (Singapore Courtesy Campaign mascot)?

4. What does Singapore mean to you?
Answer: Home. The place where I am born and raised. Where I served my National Service, strengthening my blood ties to this nation. A homeland free of natural or man-made disasters which I am truly grateful for.

5. What is your dream for Singapore?
Answer: A City of inclusive Possibilities & Talents, where success can be defined in many ways, not just solely academic success. Creative minds can be nurtured. Equal chances of social mobility are given to all born-bred Singaporeans, regardless of race/language/religion/educational or family background/gender/disability and sexual orientation, as long as one strives to improve himself/herself. Singaporeans becoming more civic-minded, polite, considerate and compassionate towards helping fellow needy citizens.